The Hallberg Center for the Arts is open again , but to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and for the health and well-being of our visitors, volunteers and the community, we will be placing some requirements and limits on visitors and voluteers.  We will be open normal hours Thursday through SaturdayVolunteers and guests will be required to wear a mask (if you don't have one, we will provide on for you).  We are limiting the total volunteers and guests to a total of 15 people in the gallery at any given time.  Sanitizer will be available.  Social distancing is required.

Thanks for your understanding.  Everyone at The Wyoming Area Creative Arts Community.

Growing up in Chicago in a family of writers, editors and educators, my art early on gravitated toward books. In college I discovered the art of etching, a process of drawing, printing and making editions. Since then, my life’s work has taken me from the Midwest to California and finally to Minnesota, with most of this time spent designing, illustrating and writing books, and working at the art of printmaking in my home studio. I also worked for thirty-one years as the art director for Hazelden Publishing, retiring early in 2013. During this span I also wrote and illustrated several children’s books of my own, and illustrated many others for Hazelden and other publishers. Artist Statement My goal as an artist is to communicate the healing power in the beauty of our natural world by creating art that helps people connect with this world in whatever environment they live.  This connection is available to all of us when we learn to focus on the world as it is under our feet, right in front of our eyes.

David Spohn

The Tiny Art of Printmaking

Growing up in Chicago in a family of writers, editors and educators, my art early on gravitated toward books. In college I discovered the art of etching, a process of drawing, printing and making editions. Since then, my life’s work has taken me from the Midwest to California and finally to Minnesota, with most of this time spent designing, illustrating and writing books, and working at the art of printmaking in my home studio.

I also worked for thirty-one years as the art director for Hazelden Publishing, retiring early in 2013. During this span I also wrote and illustrated several children’s books of my own, and illustrated many others for Hazelden and other publishers.

I have been drawing and making books all my life. As an art director, book designer, writer and illustrator, I have created or helped create hundreds of books and educational publications. This includes the writing and illustrating of several children's books of my own.

I have also been a printmaker for many years, and this is where my work is now most focused. My studio blends technologies new and old. Next to a MacIntosh computer is a gracefully aging Sturges etching press on which I hand print editions of my solar plate etchings.

Raised in Chicago, I have lived and worked in Illinois, California, Iowa and finally Minnesota, where I have lived for the past forty-five years. Through my books and prints, my artistic goal has been to honor the quiet beauty of nature. My work concerns the small spaces in our natural world, and the simple stories that make our world a better place to live. What I have always loved about creating books and editions of prints is that they are media through which art can be shared. 

Artist Statement

My goal as an artist is to communicate the healing power in the beauty of our natural world by creating art that helps people connect with this world in whatever environment they live. This connection is available to all of us when we learn to focus on the world as it is under our feet, right in front of our eyes.

Solar Plate Etching

The art of etching dates back to 15th century Germany. Etching of steel began as a means of decorating armor, but was later adapted to the printing process by creating etched images onto flat steel or copper plates.

In traditional etching the plate is coated with a chemical ground which hardens into a smooth wax-like surface. A drawing is carved into the ground using a stylus, exposing the metal underneath. The plate is then placed in an acid bath which etches the exposed lines into the plate. The ground is then removed with solvent and the plate is inked. Using a series of stiff wiping tarlatans, the plate is wiped clean until the only remaining ink lies in the etched lines below the surface.

The plate is then placed on the bed of the etching press with a sheet of paper on top, covered with with 3 felt blankets. By turning the steel rollers, plate and paper then pass through the press. The great pressure of the rollers pushes the paper into the etched grooves, picking up the ink. The plate is then cleaned and inked again for multiple prints, each one signed and numbered, an original work of art. A tell-tale feature of any etching is the embossed frame around the image made by the plate passing through the press.

For hundreds of years, this process remained unchanged. In the 1970s a master printer named Dan Welden, concerned with the toxicity of chemical ground and acids, developed solar plate etching. This process substitutes a UV light-sensitive polymer coated steel plate in place of traditional plate coated with etching ground. The image is applied to the plate by placing it in direct sunlight. The polymer is water soluble, which eliminates the use of acid in favor of a bath of tap water. The finished plate is hardened by placing back it in the sun. It is then ready to print. All the artistic effects and techniques used in traditional etching remain the same. The only difference is that solar etching, in replacing chemical ground and acid with sunlight and tap water, is more sustainable for both the environment and the artist.

Information

  • Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Website:  http://quarryroadpress.com/
  • Telephone:  
  • Address:  Chisago City, Minnesota
  • Mailing Address:  Chisago City, Minnesota

 

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